Wednesday, December 16, 2009

The People in Your Neighborhood

It's funny, but we always seem to think about networking as something we do "out there".  We attend meetings and luncheons and coffees in order to meet new people.  Ironically we ignore possible connections a little closer to home, like the ones that share our same street.

I was chatting with a new friend, John Krzesicki (pronounced "Krzesicki") today.  In addition to filling me in on the exciting world of being a self-employed business development strategist, he was telling me about the adventures of his daughter, Kristen.  Among other impressive accomplishments, she spent a couple of months studying in China.  Unfortunately, in the midst of that visit, she had her wallet stolen with all of her money and credit cards.

Now from John's description of her, she is a remarkably resourceful young woman and probably could have made do, somehow.  Still, we dads will always want to help when our little girls get in trouble.  Unfortunately, trying to wire money into China is apparently an act not meant for the faint of heart, so John was a bit limited in what he could do.  Fortunately, being a great networker, John had met and maintained good relations with his neighbors.

Guess what?  One of those neighbors just happened to be an executive with a company based in Shanghai.  With a single call, that neighbor was able to make sure that Kristen could focus on her studies and not have to worry about how she was going to be paying for dinner.

Now, of course, this is kind of an unusual series of coincidence.  I mean, what are the chances, really?  Still for a little bit of effort, John has a remarkably powerful segment of his network made up of the people who he sees every day when he leaves for work.

Makes you kind of wonder who's living a few doors down from you.

So, who is living on your street?  Are you waiting for them to take the first step?

1 comment:

  1. What a good thought! While I live out in the country and don't have any close neighbors, as I was reading the above post, I immediately thought of someone I know who has connections in China, also. You showed us how to connect and that listening is an important part of the connection process.

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